The senior class traditionally presented a play in the spring. On May 8, 1915, they put on three one-act plays in the new Silver Memorial Gymnasium. KUA’s young women also performed, Spirit of Sisterhood, a pageant, in June 1915. "The graceful Greek dancers run in and follow their leader in a dance symbolic of spring."

The senior class traditionally presented a play in the spring. On May 8, 1915, they put on three one-act plays in the new Silver Memorial Gymnasium. KUA’s young women also performed, Spirit of Sisterhood, a pageant, in June 1915. “The graceful Greek dancers run in and follow their leader in a dance symbolic of spring.”

This year, we have commemorated Kimball Union’s return to coeducation in the fall of 1974, and have honored various women who, for over 200 years, have influenced the growth and success of the Academy. From the four young women of the class of 1816 who dared to be the first to be educated in a school originally established for “poor and pious young men” studying for the ministry; to Hannah Kimball, Daniel’s widow, whose dream of an Academy for young women was realized when, through her efforts, “A regularly organized Female Department went into operation in the autumn of 1840;” to former teacher Myra Everest (1879-1881), who upon hearing of the Academy’s difficulties filling the school, devised the One Hundred Dollar Plan “…whereby a student paid $100 for board, room, fuel, lights, and full tuition rights, but was required to work ‘cheerfully’ for one hour a day;” to the dedicated women faculty, staff and now trustees, who have all had such a strong influence on and shown such care for their students. And to the young women themselves whose numbers grew from four in 1816 with many hundreds more enrolled through 1934; to the 11 women in 1974, who entered what had been a boys’ school for the previous 39 years, into the thousand plus successful graduates since 1975: young women who have had a powerful influence on the success of Kimball Union in the classroom, the arts, athletics, volunteer activities, student government or just as good citizens. We celebrate them all!

: "They join in the stately minuet but scorn the peasants who pass to drink at the spring. Useless is the Spirits' pleas for mercy."

: “They join in the stately minuet but scorn the peasants who pass to drink at the spring. Useless is the Spirits’ pleas for mercy.”

Before we wish the 199th graduating class farewell, we should take a moment to look back 100 years when another class celebrated, with satisfaction, their graduation. A summary of the school year 1914-1915 appeared in The Bulletin of Kimball Union Academy in August 1915 and is reprinted below. I think, in many ways, it could be written of all the school years as each generation celebrates its accomplishments and what, at their time, seemed a great deal of good work.

The Bulletin of Kimball Union Academy

Editorial

THE YEAR 1914–1915 IN RETROSPECT

These team pictures were taken on the steps of the newly opened Silver Memorial Gymnasium in the spring of 1915. Left: The 1915 baseball team played 6 games:

These team pictures were taken on the steps of the newly opened Silver Memorial Gymnasium in the spring of 1915. The 1915 baseball team played 6 games.

As each year in the life of a school or of an individual brings its particular problems, so when completed, it should bring a distinct sense of satisfaction due to its particular successes. In looking back over the year 1914-1915 in the life of the Academy, certain things stand out prominently as matters worthy of favorable comment. In the first place, the opening of the gymnasium, with the beginning of the year, and its constant use has given to the athletic life of the school an invigorated tone. A better spirit than formerly has been shown at practice and in the games themselves. A greater percentage of the members of the school have taken part in organized athletics, and the teams have reflected this interest in a greater number of victories than for some years past. Another encouraging sign has been the increased scholarship standards, as shown by more students on the honor rolls and a much larger number of pupils from the Senior Class deciding for college and other institutions of higher education. The young men and women of the Academy are coming to see, to a degree at least, that the spirit to be shown in the class-room and on the athletic field must be the same.  The body of alumni have responded in a marked degree to the various appeals that have been made to them during the year. Two enthusiastic meetings of alumni have been held and prompt and generous responses have been made to appeals for funds for current expenses and for a small athletic endowment. Loyalty and co-operation have characterized the relations between alumni, students and teachers and from such co-operation and loyalty has resulted an efficient and vital school spirit. Altogether the year 1914-1915 has been a good year in the annals of the Academy.

Pictured here are a few members of what was described as a large group out for track in 1915. Apparently, the team results were not great as it was written that many of the younger athletes had little experience so the hope was for better results the following spring.

The 1915 track team.

The Class of 1915 celebrated the annual Senior Trip, a hike up Mount Ascutney, with a photograph taken on the summit.

The Class of 1915 celebrated the annual Senior Trip, a hike up Mount Ascutney, with a photograph taken on the summit. 

A few members of the Class of 1915 returned to Kimball Union in 1965 for their 50th reunion.

A few members of the Class of 1915 returned to Kimball Union in 1965 for their 50th reunion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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