Left: This 1813 issue of the Charter for [Kimball] Union Academy notes Daniel Kimball’s gift of $6,000 and two acres of land for the new academy.

Below: Daniel’s father Benjamin built a mill below Meriden’s “Mill Bridge” on Colby Hill Road and a house opposite the bridge, seen above. It was replaced in 1963/64 with a larger one.

Governor Jordan answered a call to alumni from the editors of the student newspaper, The Kimball Union, to recall their student days and to share their reasons for their continued support of KUA. Some of their responses were printed in the February 1903 issue of the newspaper. Jordan’s letter included a description of Daniel Kimball’s personal efforts in the building project, “My father was present when Hon. Daniel Kimball was building the first academy. He said the old gentleman was hauling stone with his old mare hitched to a stone-boat, and laying up the foundation with his own hands. He endowed it living and dying.” The building was dedicated on January 9, 1815; instruction began the next day.

 

Left: Chester B. Jordan, KUA Class of 1866, served in New Hampshire as Speaker of the House of Representatives, President of the Senate and as the 48th Governor (1901-1903). Right: This unknown artist’s vision of the “First Academy” was drawn for the cover of the Kimball Union Bulletin in 1948.

Jordan wrote that the “academy was opened for boys. Later on, girls, too, were admitted, but kept entirely from the boys except in the recitation room. No longer ago than when I was in attendance [1866] they were not allowed to walk the street together.” He praised the faculty and Academy when he included these words, “The personnel of the faculty and the morale of the institution have ever been all that could be desired. There was, and is, no opportunity at Meriden to learn anything but good.” I’m sure this was one of the reasons he continued to support KUA 37 years after he had graduated.

The first edition of The Kimball Union was printed near the end of the 19th Century in April 1892. What is the newspaper’s 21st Century name? Why do you think it was given that name?

Answer to last week’s question: Owning much of the land in and around Meriden, Daniel Kimball placed the first Academy building on the same site as the future Baxter Hall and directly across the green from his home. Daniel and Hannah intended to keep a personal eye on its development and activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Right: This unknown artist’s vision of the “First Academy” was drawn for the cover of the Kimball Union Bulletin in 1948.

 

 

 

Jordan wrote that the “academy was opened for boys. Later on, girls, too, were admitted, but kept entirely from the boys except in the recitation room. No longer ago than when I was in attendance [1866] they were not allowed to walk the street together.” He praised the faculty and Academy when he included these words, “The personnel of the faculty and the morale of the institution have ever been all that could be desired. There was, and is, no opportunity at Meriden to learn anything but good.” I’m sure this was one of the reasons he continued to support KUA 37 years after he had graduated.

 

The first edition of The Kimball Union was printed near the end of the 19th Century in April 1892. What is the newspaper’s 21st Century name? Why do you think it was given that name?

 

Answer to last week’s question: Owning much of the land in and around Meriden, Daniel Kimball placed the first Academy building on the same site as the future Baxter Hall and directly across the green from his home. Daniel and Hannah intended to keep a personal eye on its development and activities.